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Bloody Sunday

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Park bantam, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. Park bantam

    Park bantam Well-Known Member

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    if there has been wrong doing then it’s right to bring prosecutions. However when terrorists at that time have received immunity it seems unfair to me
     
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  2. Tony Wilkinson

    Tony Wilkinson Well-Known Member
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    Poor trooper 'F' is being used as a scapegoat after 47 years ffs
     
  3. bantam65

    bantam65 Well-Known Member
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    Unfair?
    fecking understatement of the century.
    Terrorist shitbags get immunity from prosecution and those already imprisoned get released if they've served more than two years.
    My medal is going back... I feel betrayed.
     
  4. Utters0

    Utters0 Well-Known Member

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    It’s another symptom of what the wet fart establishment has become. Sympathise and make excuses for the scum and persecute the good. It’s a clusterf*ck of huge proportions
     
  5. Steve1970

    Steve1970 Well-Known Member

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    Well I hope the British government will now go back and recall all the terrorists who where released early back to prison to serve the rest of their term. If its good enough for them to prosecute a soldier they put there to do a job its good enough for the terrorists who volunteer to plant bombs and shoot at innocent people.
     
  6. Steve1970

    Steve1970 Well-Known Member

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    How is doing a job you are trained wrong doing? The British government put soldiers in Northern Ireland now they want to prosecute one for doing as he was ordered to do.
     
  7. abbomf

    abbomf Well-Known Member

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    In a highly charged environment, some British soldiers lost the plot, it could all be explained but it could never be excused, like My Lai perhaps?

    But it should never be forgotten nor should the length of time be a reason for not achieving justice for the victims families. Two wrongs don't make a right..

    28 unarmed civilians were killed by British troops......all 28 conveniently forgotten in the above posts. There should be a price to pay, one that should have been paid decades ago.
     
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  8. Park bantam

    Park bantam Well-Known Member

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    Under the terms if the good Friday agreement some murdering terrorist were not prosecuted or released from prison. Soldiers acting stupidly under extreme provocation should after all this time should be left alone
     
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  9. bantam65

    bantam65 Well-Known Member
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    The murderous scumbags of the IRA are free to walk the streets and totally immune from prosecution despite sone of them openly admitting to carrying out killings,bombings etc yet we are willing to take to task the very people that our government sent to do a job... smacks of bloody hypocrisy. The good Friday agreement has a lot to answer for... it is a get out of jail free card for terrorists and even now they aren't upholding their side of the deal.
     
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  10. abbomf

    abbomf Well-Known Member

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    Any "murderous scumbags" of the British army have been free to walk the streets, they could be well pleased with a 28-0 win and what a "job" they did. You cant have it both ways.
     
  11. Park bantam

    Park bantam Well-Known Member

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    Excuse me has there been any convictions yet. I think an apology is needed
     
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  12. bantam65

    bantam65 Well-Known Member
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    28-0?
    What are you jabbering about?
     
  13. Steve1970

    Steve1970 Well-Known Member

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    Have you ever seen the rules of engagement card every soldier is issued stepping foot into Northern Ireland ?
     
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  14. BradfordBanter

    BradfordBanter Well-Known Member

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    Had my posted deleted, you should share a room with Jeremy Corbyn with your sympathetic view towards terrorists. Awful post.
     
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  15. Rogered Tart

    Rogered Tart Well-Known Member

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    My uncle served a few tours of Northern Ireland amongst other places. Asked to do what was an impossible task, he had my utmost respect when he told how much it affected him. Remember my dad telling me how once he came back home on leave and they had to find him in town for his own safety because he’d offered to fight everyone in the Irish pubs.
     
  16. Pineapple Salesman

    Pineapple Salesman Moderator
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    It seems to be the case that as long as someone is wearing a British Army uniform, their actions can always be justified and they can never do any wrong.

    The former soldier is facing charges of murdering 2 civil rights protesters. Why should I feel sympathy for someone in this position, just because they were wearing a British Army uniform?

    The Troubles escalated heavily after Bloody Sunday with increased IRA membership and an increased volume of killings following this.

    This being said, sentencing someone for an action in 1972 feels like opening a can of worms because there were numerous atrocities committed during The Troubles by Republicans and Loyalists which will now not be punished.
     
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  17. Park bantam

    Park bantam Well-Known Member

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    I have a son in law who later in the troubles was a junior officer serving in The north of Ireland he is still traumatised from it today.
    It’s not like usual conflict danger can come from passers by or a nearby window and snipers it is in this context that judging the actions on that day should be judged. This soldier life was in danger it his difficult for anybody not in that position to Judge. I think it is totally wrong to put this guy on trial now when cowardly murderers where spared by the good Friday agreement
     
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  18. trevor

    trevor Well-Known Member
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    While not agreeing with the amnesty for the IRA who should be hunted and prosecuted for the crimes they committed this is the account from the inquiry of how the victims died, None of the protesters were found to be armed and there were no casualties on the Army side, I make no judgement on the decision to prosecute as have not seen the evidence but post this list for those who may not know the details

    The casualties are listed in the order in which they were killed.
    • John 'Jackie' Duddy, age 17. Shot as he ran away from soldiers in the car park of Rossville Flats. The bullet struck him in the shoulder and entered his chest. Three witnesses said they saw a soldier take deliberate aim at the youth as he ran. He was the first fatality on Bloody Sunday. Like Saville, Widgery also concluded that Duddy was unarmed.
    • Michael Kelly, age 17. Shot in the stomach while standing at the rubble barricade on Rossville Street. Both Saville and Widgery concluded that Kelly was unarmed.
    • Hugh Gilmour, age 17. Shot as he ran away from soldiers near the rubble barricade. The bullet went through his left elbow and entered his chest. Widgery acknowledged that a photograph taken seconds after Gilmour was hit corroborated witness reports that he was unarmed, and that tests for gunshot residue were negative.
    • William Nash, age 19. Shot in the chest at the rubble barricade. Witnesses stated Nash was unarmed. Three people were shot while apparently going to his aid, including his father Alexander Nash.
    • John Young, age 17. Shot in the face at the rubble barricade, apparently while crouching and going to the aid of William Nash. Two witnesses stated Young was unarmed.
    • Michael McDaid, age 20. Shot in the face at the rubble barricade, apparently while crouching and going to the aid of William Nash.
    • Kevin McElhinney, age 17. Shot from behind, near the rubble barricade, while attempting to crawl to safety. Two witnesses stated McElhinney was unarmed.
    • James 'Jim' Wray, age 22. Shot in the back while running away from soldiers in Glenfada Park courtyard. He was then shot again in the back as he lay mortally wounded on the ground. Witnesses, who were not called to the Widgery Tribunal, stated that Wray was calling out that he could not move his legs before he was shot the second time.
    • William McKinney, age 27. Shot in the back as he attempted to flee through Glenfada Park courtyard.
    • Gerard McKinney, age 35. Shot in the chest at Abbey Park. A soldier ran through an alleyway from Glenfada Park and shot him from a few yards away. Witnesses said that when he saw the soldier, McKinney stopped and held up his arms, shouting "Don't shoot! Don't shoot!", before being shot. The bullet apparently went through his body and struck Gerard Donaghy behind him.
    • Gerard Donaghy, age 17. Shot in the stomach at Abbey Park while standing behind Gerard McKinney. Both were apparently struck by the same bullet. Bystanders brought Donaghy to a nearby house, where he was examined by a doctor. The doctor opened Donaghy's clothes to examine him, and his pockets were also searched for identification. Two bystanders then attempted to drive Donaghy to hospital, but the car was stopped at an Army checkpoint. They were ordered to leave the car and a soldier drove it to a Regimental Aid Post, where an Army medical officer pronounced Donaghy dead. Shortly after, soldiers found four nail bombs in his pockets. The civilians who searched him, the soldier who drove him to the Army post, and the Army medical officer, all said that they did not see any bombs. This led to claims that soldiers planted the bombs on Donaghy to justify the killings. Donaghy was a member of Fianna Éireann, an IRA-linked republican youth movement. Paddy Ward, a police informer] who gave evidence at the Saville Inquiry, claimed he gave two nail bombs to Donaghy several hours before he was shot. The Saville Report concluded that the bombs were probably in Donaghy's pockets when he was shot. However, it concluded that he was not about to throw a bomb when he was shot; and that he was not shot because he had bombs. "He was shot while trying to escape from the soldiers".
    • Patrick Doherty, age 31. Shot from behind while attempting to crawl to safety in the forecourt of Rossville Flats. He was shot by soldiers who came out of Glenfada Park. Doherty was photographed, moments before and after he died, by French journalist Gilles Peress. Despite testimony from "Soldier F" that he had shot a man holding a pistol, Widgery acknowledged that the photographs show Doherty was unarmed, and that forensic tests on his hands for gunshot residue proved negative.
    • Bernard 'Barney' McGuigan, age 41. Shot in the head when he walked out from cover to help Patrick Doherty. He had been waving a white handkerchief to indicate his peaceful intentions.
    • John Johnston, age 59. Shot in the leg and left shoulder on William Street 15 minutes before the rest of the shooting started. Johnston was not on the march, but on his way to visit a friend in Glenfada Park. He died on 16 June 1972; his death has been attributed to the injuries he received on the day. He was the only one not to die immediately or soon after being shot.
     
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  19. Bigrod

    Bigrod Moderator
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    It strikes me that there should be an amnesty for all involved in the so called ‘troubles’.
    People did things that were plainly very wrong and in some cases utterly destructive, be it the Armed Forces, Irish Nationalists or Protestant Unionists.
     
  20. abbomf

    abbomf Well-Known Member

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    Grow up & debate... if you can.

    What "terrorists" were killed that day?

    Trevor's post of the victims makes sobering reading. Other posts are quite illuminating and show the, still, contempt for Ireland, who's troubles are entirely British made.
     

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